How do German elections work? | BWG
Read Time:7 Second

How do German elections work? | BWG

0 0



Germany has an election process so complex that even some Germans don’t understand it. CNBC’s Elizabeth Schulze breaks down the voting system before … .

source

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

31 thoughts on “How do German elections work? | BWG

  1. I didnt even start watching the video. But I am German (like my username says) and I understand our election system. You have a person from one of several parties you can vote directly into the Bundestag (our parlament) and then your second vote goes to one party. This vote is indirectly for the cancelor (at the bundestag election). The party that wins will decide which person of them will become cancelor. But they always say which person will be their candidate and will run for cancelor. This year we have Armin Laschet for CDU (Merkel`s party), Olaf Scholz for SPD and Annalena Baerbock for the party called "Die Grünen" (the greens) the other parties only have candidates who lead their election fights but they will probably not get so many votes, so the main interrest is between SPD, CDU and "die Grünen".
    The American election process and vote system is very complex and I have no idea, why the person with the majority of votes can still lose the election.

  2. a small error at about 3:50: you said "… where the biggest party teams up with some smaller parties …",
    – no there is no rule that the "biggest party" has to lead the coalition. If for example, nobody else wants to cooperate with the biggest faction and instead no. 2 and 3 decide to work together, then the biggest faction might end up leading the opposition.
    I think this happened in the 1970ies, when the CDU&CSU faction won the most seats in the Bundestag, but the other parties (SPD and FDP) decided to form a government.

    Whoever gets the support of more than 50% in parliament, becomes Bundeskanzler(in) and can form the government… no matter if he/she belongs to the "largest party " or not.

  3. Wow. Reading some of those generalizing and dumb comments here by some fellow Germans… it makes you wonder how flawed our education system in Germany must be. Kudos to our mates across the big pond.

  4. I do not agree that German elections are fair when a good number of Germans DO NOT understand the ballot paper= what is required from the voter. It is so complicated, UNNECCESSARILY. Most Germans do not want to admit that they are confused and tacitly accept the election result. ALSO, the ruling CDU is known as the MONEYED party, like the Tories in Britain, while the socialists have to struggle to explain how they will raise funds. I think EVERYWHERE in Europe at the moment MONEY RULES and the people have to accept it

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

United States of America Previous post United States of America | BWG
5 Things YOU DON’T SAY to Germans Next post 5 Things YOU DON’T SAY to Germans