Latin America’s Wild Economic History, Explained | The Wealth of Nations
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Latin America’s Wild Economic History, Explained | The Wealth of Nations | BWG

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If you would like to take a deeper dive into the data, visit http://nobledatum.com/thewealthofnations The economic history of Latin America is filled with promise … .

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22 thoughts on “Latin America’s Wild Economic History, Explained | The Wealth of Nations | BWG

  1. Nice work, but it could be improved balancing the epistemological bias of the narrative. Take a look: What's new about inequality in #LatinAmerica?
    Inequality is very high in the region and is underestimated in official measures. Since 2000, inequality declined in Argentina, Colombia, Ecuador and Uruguay, but rose in Chile, Mexico and Brazil. Amidst a decline of inequality levels in some countries, the persistence of #extreme #inequality slowed #poverty reduction progress over the past years.
    👉 Read new findings by Mauricio De Rosa, Ignacio Flores & Marc Morgan: https://wid.world/news-article/inequality-in-latin-america/
    📊 Data: wid.world/world
    #GlobalInequalityData
    🔸 Latin America ranks among the most unequal regions in 2019:
    – The top 10% captured 54% of the national income, over half of it!
    – The poorest 50% captured 10% of the average national income
    In comparison, Africa's top 10% captured 50% of the national income and Middle East's top 10% captured 56%
    🔸 Most unequal countries: Chile, Mexico and Brazil are the 3 most unequal countries in 2019, with an extreme #concentration of #income at the top of the distribution. Top 10%:
    – Chile: 60%
    – Mexico: 58%
    – Brazil: 57%
    🔸 Least unequal countries: Ecuador, Argentina and Uruguay appear to be the least unequal countries of the region in 2019, when looking at the top 10% share of national income:
    – Ecuador: 38%
    – Argentina: 40%
    – Uruguay: 42%
    ⚠ Data quality is highly heterogeneous in the region. Significant data inconsistencies are found, especially on national accounts.
    Check the data quality wid.world/transparency

  2. It would be really interesting some research and a video of the history of Latin America and the evolution of their territories. The pre-columbian and advanced civilizations that existed for centuries in very prosperous and rich regions, the arrival of Europeans mainly from Spain and Portugal, the development and economies of the Viceroyalties established since the XVI century, and their relationship with the British colonies in America.
    Cheers!!

  3. Brazil did not have a bad century. Not great, but probably one of the best for Latin America. Chile didn't do poorly (Argentina and Uruguay did poorly because they were outstandingly rich in the begining of the century for countries dependent on commodity export) but it's not richer now in relation to the rich countries than it was in the begining of the century, like Brazil.

  4. i dont know why people get this so wrong. Panama canal does not represent 40% of the gdp. it barely represents 4% of the gdp. around 2-3 billion dollars in a 70billion nominal gdp economy.

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