Why nations fail | James Robinson | TEDxAcademy
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Why nations fail | James Robinson | TEDxAcademy | BWG

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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Why do some states enjoy wealth, security, health and nutrition … .

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45 thoughts on “Why nations fail | James Robinson | TEDxAcademy | BWG

  1. The word "patent" is not in the US Constitution, and innovation happens all the time without anyone registering a patent. The incentive to profit, and fear of starvation, creates innovation.

  2. Its interesting seeing him try to associate poor and rich with inclusive and extractive institutions. There are SO many variables and history involved with countries that make them poor or rich, and so many other variables that you have to take into account if you'd associate a country as "poor" or "rich".
    There's tonnes of inequality, poor healthcare, and corruption in "rich" countries, for example a lot of places in America can be considered third world in terms of government services, healthcare and wealth.
    Additionally, its easy to say african countries are poor because of their economic organisation, when in fact it also has a lot to do with the empires who came to their continent, exploited their people and resources for hundreds of years, enslaved them. then left them with extremely corrupt governments

  3. He didn't mention the role of colonialism and the exploitation and extraction of resources and labor by the former colonialists. The poor countries have failed to develop their inclusive institutions because historically they have been derailed from doing so due to the inconvenience that would cause to a few countries.

  4. What the talker and his book completely miss is the effect of external infulence. Of course, inconvenient topic, since both USA and England made and to a large extent still make their wealth through attacking, plundering and robbing other countries, then keeping these countries in subdued positions by installing corrupt governments. This enables a continued extraction of wealth and resources. Has been going on like this for centuries.

  5. They stole everything from places like the Congo and left a vacuum now we’re here talking about inclusive institutions… the entire colonial era was an extractive institution! Patent system conveniently starts when they’re half way across the world pillaging other peoples ideas! And then the USA as a democratic society in 1790? I don’t think the slaves would agree! Then USA taking people to account? One of the most corrupt systems in the world!? This talk irked me beyond belief! Misdirection at its best! No historical context WHATSOEVER!

  6. while the US is more prosperous than Mexico and is considered a rich country, its gini coefficient is also one of the highest in the world. I think the author should write a new vol. of the book perhaps to be titled: why nations are more equal

  7. I think that the theory put forward by James Robinson in his book is invaluable and accurate. But I think there is a conflict between what that theory could generate in practice and what it wants to generate theoretically in the book. Let me explain: at the beginning of the video Robinson says that the rules of a state should create incentives and opportunities, but reaching the end he says that is necessary a political project in which a state that enforces the rules is reconciled with democracy . All this to avoid the use of the state to promote private interests and not public interests by making clientelism for example. So what would happen if the state policies propposed by a group of politicians are sold to the population as public interests (when they are not) and people believe it? being the people unable to understand that this is harmful to society as a whole and entering a spiral of decline.
    So this is where there is a hidden premise in Robinson's reasoning. People need to understand and agree with each other and with politicians about what those public interests to defend are. I think it is highly unlikely that this understanding within society will lead to conclusions that create institutions that foster opportunities and incentives. Robinson believes that nobody is going to question that what he calls inclusive institutions are the correct ones and nobody is going to doubt that they pursue the public interest (when this is a very ambiguous and politically usable concept). And it also does not take into account that it is highly unlikely that politicians are actually working to pursue the public interest. Hardly anyone in society is really looking for that.

  8. History shows that Art is the main factor in the fall and rise of the Nations. Human civilization is built with Art.
    Art is a source of innovation and a tool to shape the word and even portrait and imagine the future. ( not patent Law )
    Nations, cultures who demote or restrict the Art, no matter how rich they may end up in misery!

  9. Very clear intro there Englishman. What you seem to have conveniently left out is that Congo in Africa, is a very wealthy nation and its thanks to many of these countries that the prosperous countries have gotten that way. Colonization, exploitation and looting backed by powerful and brutal military responses to those who dared to stand in the way of the free flow of resources from these "poor" nations to the prosperous West. Belgium, technically not even a country, brutally colinized that part of Africa.

  10. Does economic sanctions, coups, monopoly of international trade through u.s. dollar & wars waged by the west that destroys infrastructure plays a role in these nations being poor&failing?
    Perhaps it has something to do with, when such countries use national mining, metallurgy & oil companies to keep all their resources to themselves they suddenly become undemocratic and then a coup backed by the west ensues? like the situation of Venezuela?

  11. Africans would be inventing technology but they're hesitant because lack of patent laws? Seriously? I don't see any evidence Africa is motivated enough or has the raw human capital (average IQ) required to make such inventions. They didn't even maintain a simple road in Congo so why are they going to invent high technology?

  12. Good talk in many ways, but says at 12:35 "In the United States it's inconceivable that you could have such a monopolization of industry but that observation was outdated even in 2014. Apple notwithstanding, Bill Gates' Windows was and is a pretty significant monopoly. Ditto for Amazon, Google and all the too-big-too fail banks. The American state actually ISN'T capable at the moment of enforcing anti-trust laws.

  13. Lo que no entiendo es por qué la gente actúa en favor a los monopolios! Entiendo que es cuestión de cifras, pero en realidad, las cifras a dónde llevan? De verdad todo este lío se deriva de un juego de egos? No me cabe en la cabeza!

  14. Microsoft was fined for being a monopoly with about half a billion euros by eu, which was the biggest fine in its history :)) and here this gentleman talking about the mexican guy being a monopoly and bill gates being inventor !!! So this is why some nations are poor, western monopoly and manipulation ! Get outta here!!

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